Fringe 2014

REVIEW – Sister

*****

Striptease, pole dancing, real life accounts and performance art all meet in a somewhat baffling though very powerful performance of ‘Sister’. As if designed to break taboos the sisters Amy and Rosana play on sex and feminism in a unique blend of highly charged erotic dancing and a stripped bare (figuratively and literally) first person […]

REVIEW – Loose Soul

*****

By Isabella Fraser Multi-media is a growing part of this year’s Fringe – there have been many productions that weave at least a couple of strands of multi-media into the body of their text. Loose Soul makes great use of a split screen curtain on which video images play in the background to a soothing […]

REVIEW – Near Gone

*****

Near Gone is an amusing, heart-wrenching, thought-provoking play, its story simple enough in plot, yet complex in its emotions and creative in its telling. Two people, one speaking in Bulgarian and one in English, relate a striking incident. It is built up to, run away from, and finally reflected upon with consummate skill not only […]

REVIEW – Pomegranate Jam

*****

Pomegranate Jam: A Shadow Ballet combines puppetry and dance, with live music, and multi-cultural influences including Balinese dance, Indian music and Greek myths. The story is based on the myth of Persephone, carried off to the Underworld by Hades, to the great distress of her mother Demeter. As Persephone ate part of a fruit from […]

REVIEW – Imran Yusuf

*****

By A MacDonald Imran Yusuf, Best newcomer nominee 2010 and star of Michael Macintyre’s comedy Roadshow is back performing at the Fringe after a 2 year break. In his show, Roar of the underdog, he looks to confront issues of race, religion, bigotry and sexism head on in a cheerful and funny way, whilst still […]

REVIEW – Great Artists Steal

*****

By Isabella Fraser There is a mythology that Picasso once said: “Good artists copy, great artists steal” – the actual provenance of the quote travels through writers W H Davenport Adams and T S Eliot to Apple creator Steve Jobs. Ironically this quote then becomes its only self-fulfilling prophecy (that great experts adapt and improve […]

REVIEW – Et Tu Elvie

*****

By Isabella Fraser Billed as: “The life of Elvis Presley told as a seven part Shakespearean tragedy”, this musical theatre show as always going to be something unusual – and it is. Directed by Nancy Medina and co-created with Peter Phillips, it is overly complex. The dichotomy of this production as a whole does not […]

REVIEW – Broke

*****

By Isabella Fraser The Paper Birds, the company producing Broke, writes: “There are 13 million people in poverty in the UK and over half of these people are from working families”. Being ‘broke’ means different things to different people. This multi-media verbatim play explores not only the financial implications of being broke, but also the […]

REVIEW: Colin Cloud – The Forensic Mind Reader

*****

By Isabella Fraser Colin Cloud – an offbeat, spiky-haired cheeky chappie – is a living Sherlock Holmes. For anyone who has ever dreamed of being Holmes, solving clues by looking at a person and proceeding to rattle off reams of obscure information about them, then you need to be taking tips from Cloud. This man […]

REVIEW -The Future for Beginners

*****

By Sigfusdottir Sitting on a park bench as part of an old couple in love. That’s the dream so many hold for their future and that’s the premise for ‘The Future for Beginners’ by liveartshow’s Martin Constantine and Alan Harris. The set is futuristic, as one might expect. When the show starts there is data […]