Author Archives: Fringe Reviewer

REVIEW – Ada/Ava, Manual Cinema

*****

  By Jen Bolsover Beautiful, chilling and quietly heartbreaking, Ada/Ava is the brainchild of Chicago-based Manual Cinema. Audience members of a certain age may have flashbacks to primary school assemblies when they walk in and see a row of old-fashioned overhead projectors, but all such recollections are quickly dispelled when the projected images come to […]

REVIEW: Machina – Malcostume Teatro

*****

    Machine is a show that frustrates and appeals in equal measure. Its concept is quirky and entertaining – a one-man commedia dell’arte show where most of the characters appear by projection and interact with one live actor. It’s a brilliant idea, and the actor (whom I would namecheck, but the company’s website is […]

REVIEW – Outside the Box, Full Circle

*****

  By Jen Bolsover Sweet, gentle and quietly devastating, Liz Rothschild’s “live show about death” is perhaps the only show on the Fringe where you can watch a woman weave her own coffin. In fact, it’s hard to imagine that anyone will have been in and out of their coffin as frequently as Rothschild by […]

REVIEW – Adler & Gibb – Tim Crouch/Royal Court Theatre

*****

  By Jen Bolsover There’s almost an interesting plot in Tim Crouch’s latest project for the Royal Court, Adler and Gibb. The play concerns an actress and director who go on a research trip in preparation for shooting a film about boundary-pushing artist Janet Adler. They find her home, her unmarked burial site, and her […]

REVIEW: Deal with the Dragon, First Sprout Theatre

*****

  By Jen Bolsover Always intriguing and occasionally heart-rending, Deal with the Dragon is a one-man show about struggling, traumatised artist Hunter and his not-so-imaginary friend and protector, dragon Brennchen Feuer. Drawing on fairytales where help is always at hand and the price is always higher than you realise, Kevin Rolston plays out the story […]

REVIEW – Shhh – An Improvised Silent Movie, i Bugiardini

*****

  By Jen Bolsover The ideas behind Shhh… are good. Creating improvised silent movies has a lot of potential, since there are so many well-known tropes and images to draw on and subvert. There’s also lots of mileage in the concept of live-typing the intertitles (the text cards showing narrative and speech), coming up with […]

REVIEW: The Vaudevillains, Les Enfants Terribles

*****

    By Jen Bolsover In the lavish surroundings of the Spiegeltent a story of murder and music hall unfolds. The Vaudevillains make for a charming, mildly macabre 70 minutes and a good way to round out an evening at the Fringe. The motley assortment of artistes features mimes and magicians, a ventriloquist, a knife […]

REVIEW: Adventure Quest

*****

  By Isabella Fraser This is the show for you if you love old style computer games, complete with eighties synthetic music and graphics. On a large screen backdrop the computer game screen is shown. In front of this we meet our Hero and the cast of characters he encounters. A voiceover interacts with the […]

REVIEW: Equus

*****

  By Isabella Fraser This version of Peter Shaffer’s well known play is presented by the youthful Rep Theatre Company. Despite their youth, they bring a dedication to the production and the difficult storyline contained within it, although overall the acting is somewhat patchy. The direction of this piece is clear and unfussy; there is […]

REVIEW: The Country Wife

*****

    By Danielle Farrow William Wycherley’s 1675 Restoration comedy ‘The Country Wife’ is the three pronged tale of Harry Horner, who feigns – with medical support – impotency in order to be left alone with other men’s wives, Margery Pinchwife of the title, married by a very jealous man for her unknowing country ways […]